(Source: thejogging, via yumizoomi)

2,434 notes

ikilledcaptainclown:

omfg

ikilledcaptainclown:

omfg

(Source: sarkos, via thosedamnedbees)

1,202 notes

cyberpharaoh:

bootythug:

rocketumbl:

Vitaly Bulgarov

hold the fucking phone

its some kind of

Metal Gear

(via megasonger)

9,188 notes

little-vince:

Bearded Dragon with cardboard by cardboard artist 鍾凱翔 Zhongkai Xiang

(via jesscookie)

29,435 notes

scottlava:

"Ghostbustland"
My contribution to Gallery 1988’s Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Show, starting in NYC! (It travels to some more cities, but i am unsure of the details, you guys)
Opening April 19 …runs through 26th
@ 69 Leonard Street in lower manhattan.  (Right around the corner from the Ghostbusters Firehouse)

scottlava:

"Ghostbustland"

My contribution to Gallery 1988’s Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Show, starting in NYC! (It travels to some more cities, but i am unsure of the details, you guys)

Opening April 19 …runs through 26th

@ 69 Leonard Street in lower manhattan.  (Right around the corner from the Ghostbusters Firehouse)

(via amummy)

2,106 notes

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of  Metal by selçuk yılmaz

Created from nearly 4,000 pieces of metal scraps, Aslan, is a recent sculpture by Istanbul-based artist Selçuk Yılmaz. The piece took nearly a year of work and involved hand-cutting and hammering of each individual metal piece. The final work weighs roughly 550 pounds (250kg). While we’ve seen dozens of artists use multiple components to create a final form, it’s worth noting how well the bent mental lends itself to the final shape of this impressive cat.

(Source: asylum-art, via fuwe)

15,773 notes

ca-tsuka:

The Dam Keeper animated gifs based on short-film by Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo.

(via pepsie)

2,959 notes

grawly:

what the fuck…. how did they get away with this…

grawly:

what the fuck…. how did they get away with this…

(via megasonger)

1,107 notes

iguanamouth:

"so youre saying all you can make are SAUCES and PLATES??"

"actually theyre, um, saucers"

(via flatluigi)

6,803 notes

(Source: ms-dos5, via duckhop)

16,181 notes

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

(via helpyoudraw)

10,491 notes

chickensnack:

i like this mario that i drew 6 years ago

chickensnack:

i like this mario that i drew 6 years ago

183 notes

cvilbrandt:

capo-verde:

envycamacho:

kim-jong-healthy:

humpback whales in their natural habitat before deforestation forced them into the sea

this is actually so cool

Fuck

Neeeeeat

248,113 notes

helenasund:

m0rethanyoubargainedf0r:

Confused little baby

LOOK AT THE BABY

(via beesmygod)

33,496 notes

cineraria:

BEARS ON STAIRS on Vimeo

(via flatluigi)

2,407 notes